Can You Eat Marlin? Important Things To Know and Recipes

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Yes, you can eat marlin, but it is important to note that eating large amounts of Marlin regularly may be harmful to your health as Marlin contains a higher levels of mercury which is as a result of its diet of small fish which themselves contain some levels of mercury. If you are going to eat Marlin, it is important to do so in moderation.

Why Do Fish Contain Mercury

White Marlin In The Ocean

Fish absorb methylmercury from their food and from water as it passes over their gills. Mercury is tightly bound to proteins in all fish tissue, including muscle. There is no method of cooking or cleaning fish that will reduce the amount of mercury in a meal. – Source

If you are looking for a healthier seafood alternative, consider eating fish that are lower in mercury.

Fish Lower In Mercury

Fish that a lower in mercury are fish that are young or haven’t lived for long as mercury is absorbed over the lifetime of a fish. These include:

Anchovies

Butterfish

Catfish (farmed)

Clam

Crab (domestic)

Crawfish/Crayfish

Croaker (Atlantic)

Flounder

Haddock (Atlantic)

Hake

Herring

Mackerel (North Atlantic, chub)

Mullet

Oyster

Perch (freshwater)

Plaice

Pollock

Salmon (canned, wild)

Sardine

Scallop

Shad (American)

Shrimp

Fish High In Mercury

These are fish that eat other fish and live long lives and as a result have high levels of mercury:

Barracuda

Bluefish

Grouper

Mackerel (Spanish, Gulf)

Sea Bass (Chilean)

Snapper

Tuna (albacore, white)

Tuna (bigeye, ahi, yellowfin)

Tuna (bluefin)

Marlin

Orange Roughy

Shark

Swordfish

Tilefish

King mackerel

Gulf Coast oysters

Can You Reduce Mercury Levels In Fish

salmon fish being prepared
Salmon Fish Being Prepared. Image by congerdesign from Pixabay

Currently there is no foolproof method to remove mercury from fish. The only way to reduce your exposure to mercury is to limit your consumption of fish that are high in mercury. When buying fish, choose those that are lower in mercury. When eating fish, avoid eating the skin and fatty tissue as these tend to contain higher levels of mercury.

It is also important to be aware that some fish may contain other toxins such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxins. These can also be harmful to your health, so it is important to limit your consumption of these fish as well.

While there are some risks associated with eating fish, it is important to remember that fish is a nutritious food that can offer many health benefits. So, if you choose to eat fish, do so in moderation and select those that are lower in mercury.

Preparing Marlin for Eating

When preparing Marlin for eating, it is important to remove the skin as this is where a lot of the mercury is stored. The skin can be removed by slicing it off with a sharp knife. It is also important to remove the dark meat as this contains higher levels of mercury. The dark meat can be removed by cutting it away from the white meat.

Once the skin and dark meat have been removed, the Marlin can be cooked in a variety of ways. It can be grilled, baked, or pan-fried. Marlin is a versatile fish that can be flavored in a variety of ways.

When cooking Marlin, it is important not to overcook it as this can make the fish tough and dry. Marlin is best cooked when it is still pink in the middle.

Here are Some Great Marlin Recipes:

Servings 2 steaks

Ingredients

  • 2 large blue marlin steaks, about 3/4-inch thick
  • 1/3 cup pineapple juice
  • 2 tbsp. grapeseed oil 
  • 2 tbsp. sesame oil
  • 1/2 tbsp. low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 large clove garlic, minced
  • 1/2 tsp. fresh ginger, minced
  • freshly ground black pepper, to taste (I always use mixed peppercorns)

Directions 

  • In a small bowl, combine pineapple juice, grapeseed oil, sesame oil, soy sauce, garlic, ginger and black pepper. Whisk all the ingredients until well blended.
  • Put marlin steaks in a large re-sealable bag and pour the marinade over. Close the bag and massage/flip it until the steaks are well coated. Transfer to the refrigerator for 1 to 1 ½ hours, turning and massaging steaks once or twice.
  • Preheat barbecue to 500-550ºF.
  • Place the marlin steaks on a plate and discard the marinade.
  • Transfer the steaks on the hot grill, close the lid and grill for 3 minutes on one side. Flip them and cook for another 2 minutes with the lid closed.

note: If your steaks are thinner or thicker than 3/4-inch, you might want to adjust cooking time slightly.

Enjoy!

Gerald Omondi
Gerald Omondihttps://news.safaritravelplus.com
As a writer, I have a passion for exploring a variety of topics. When I'm not putting pen to paper, I enjoy traveling and spending time with my family. As a husband and father, I understand the importance of balance and finding time for the things I love. Whether I'm delving into new subjects or spending quality time with my loved ones.

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